The Resistant Anti-Semitism

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The Resistant Anti-Semitism

French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner, center, followed by Strasbourg chief Rabbi Harold Abraham Weill, second right, walk amid vandalized tombs in the Jewish cemetery of Westhoffen, west of the city of Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. Regional authorities in eastern France say vandals have scrawled anti-Semitic inscriptions, including swastikas spray-painted in black, on 107 tombs in a Jewish cemetery. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner, center, followed by Strasbourg chief Rabbi Harold Abraham Weill, second right, walk amid vandalized tombs in the Jewish cemetery of Westhoffen, west of the city of Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. Regional authorities in eastern France say vandals have scrawled anti-Semitic inscriptions, including swastikas spray-painted in black, on 107 tombs in a Jewish cemetery. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

AP

French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner, center, followed by Strasbourg chief Rabbi Harold Abraham Weill, second right, walk amid vandalized tombs in the Jewish cemetery of Westhoffen, west of the city of Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. Regional authorities in eastern France say vandals have scrawled anti-Semitic inscriptions, including swastikas spray-painted in black, on 107 tombs in a Jewish cemetery. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

AP

AP

French Interior Minister Christophe Castaner, center, followed by Strasbourg chief Rabbi Harold Abraham Weill, second right, walk amid vandalized tombs in the Jewish cemetery of Westhoffen, west of the city of Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. Regional authorities in eastern France say vandals have scrawled anti-Semitic inscriptions, including swastikas spray-painted in black, on 107 tombs in a Jewish cemetery. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

Peyton Manning, Editor-in-Chief

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Throughout history, anti-semitism has affected Jewish culture in countless ways. Jews have been exiled to Poland, controlled in their exiled country, and killed for their beliefs. Until World War II, most were not treated fairly, and the war serves as a reminder of how destructive anti-semitism is. Recently, however, Jewish cemeteries and places of remembrance for the lost lives have been vandalized and harmed.
On the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz (January 27, 1945), survivors met but cried at the increase in anti-semitic acts that have taken place throughout Europe and the rest of the world. In Bulgaria, gravestones have been pushed over and fences damaged around the border. In some French cemeteries, there have been spray-painted swastikas on the gravestones in graves and damaged cemetery property.
There was also a case in New Jersey, at a Kosher grocery store in which there was a team involved in killing four people on December 10. Of those four, two Jewish citizens were killed. The attackers planned more attacks centered on Jewish citizens as well. Anti-semitism is on a rise, and people put off the incidents as small or rare.
Although others may argue that the “increased” anti-semitism is nothing to worry about, the issue involves the lost lives of thousands based on who they were or what they believed in. The struggle must be diminished. One of the survivors, Ronald Lauder, pleaded, “Do not be silent! Do not be complacent! Do not let this ever happen again—to any people!”